“Ask Peres” Facebook Campaign

In recent years, Shimon Peres has branded himself as an innovation evangelist, promoting his country’s creativity and backing ideas and technological solutions geared to make the world a better place.

The 90 year old statesman is somehow always ahead of his time. Quite an impressive achievement since his time spans over an almost 70 year political career during which most of the population of the world was born.

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After his massive “Be My Friend on Facebook” campaign, that successfully danced around the presidency’s marketing laws and ethics, President Peres is now encouraging people to ask him questions in a special Facebook tab, promissing that the most “liked” questions will be answered via Youtube.

The campaign was launched yesterday (October 14), and has so far reached 150 comments, 160 shares and some media attention.

Wanna have a go at asking Peres some questions? Click here and let me know if he actually answered you back!

The campaign will run until October 31.

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Benjamin Netanyahu’s Grumpy Cat Impression

Benjamin Netanyahu’s social media team might have made the worst possible Facebook timeline photo upload choice, following the Israeli PM’s UN speech.

Why the worst? Not just because Netanyahu looks like he is doing an impression of Grumpy Cat, but mainly because his last UN speech regarding Iran, makes

benjamin netanyahu at the unIsrael appear as the peace refusnik.

The post says: “I’d like to thank the citizens of Israel for the many responses to my speech. I feel honored and privilaged to represent you”.

A note to team Netanyahu – Always consider the context of your posts, and remember that not everyone gets paid to praise your boss.

New frontiers in Twitter diplomacy: Barack Obama, the president of Iran and Jack Dorsey

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By now, most of us are pretty used to seeing Twitter as a powerful tool for real-time discussion around global events — discussion that in some cases includes the actors involved in those events, such as the historic back-and-forth between the Israeli army and the Palestinian group Hamas earlier this year. But even though that seems almost routine now, it’s still impressive to see how far-reaching Twitter can be, and how it lets the “sources go direct.”

In one of the most recent examples, Iranian president Hassan Rouhani and U.S. president Barack Obama exchanged pleasantries on Twitter both before and after a historic telephone call — then on Tuesday, Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey followed up with his own discussion with Rouhani about Twitter access and freedom of speech in that country.

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